The top 5 green building certifications in Europe.

The effects of global warming on our planet have become a topic of conversation around the globe. Nearly everyone is concerned about climate change, and many forward-thinking companies are coming forward with solutions to make their products greener.

Creating newer, greener buildings is just one example of this new trend, and green building certifications are popping up with some regularity. Here are 5 of the top green building certifications, what they are, and how they are different (in no particular order).

Creating newer, greener buildings is just one example of this new trend, and green building certifications are popping up with some regularity.

top five green building certifications
1. LEED

Although this certification program started in the United States, it is also one of the most important green building programs in Europe. LEED has a point system divided into three different categories, as do many of the different certification programs here. Points are given for every green feature added to a building, with the total amount of points determining whether the building is certified, and to which tier it qualifies for.

2. WELL Building Standard

WELL Building Standard is an international certification program. This building standard recognizes that while we spend 90% of our time in buildings, the buildings themselves may be unhealthy environments. By building to this standard, you are creating a healthy place to live and work.

The WELL building standard advertises itself as the first architectural benchmark exclusively for human health.1The standard focuses on 7 points: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind. The certification is ongoing, and must be updated once every two years.

While we spend 90% of our time in buildings, the buildings themselves may be unhealthy environments.

top five green building certifications
top five green building certifications
top five green building certifications
3. BREEAM

BREEAM stands for Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method and is an international program. The program is divided into six quality categories, ranging from “Pass” to “Outstanding.”

BREEAM targets many of the same areas that other certification programs do, such as air, water, and health, but it also takes into consideration different categories such as waste and materials. Although this certification originated in the US, it has been adopted around the world.

4. Green Globes

Green Globes is a certification program available through the Green Buildings Initiative. The certification is divided into three categories: New Construction, Existing Buildings, and Sustainable Interiors. In order to be certified, the building or interior design needs to meet at least 35% of the 1,000 possible points. An independent third-party team, a survey, and a post-assessment assess the points.

5. Living Building Challenge

What would happen if every single building created, not only tried to avoid negative impact, but actually had a positive impact on the environment? In general, new buildings have a negative impact on the environment. For example, dark coloration traps heat and can make cities even warmer than natural areas, while the building itself takes up space where vegetation and wildlife used to exist.

The goal of the Living Building Challenge is to change all that with buildings that connect people back to nature through light, water, food, and air. The buildings must be self sufficient, and create a positive impact for both people and wildlife. This is an international certification, available everywhere including Europe.

There are dozens of different certification programs around the world. Many of them share common similarities, such as striving to improve air, water, and energy use. All of them have something unique that makes their certification program stand out. The certification program you choose will depend largely on what your focus is, from human health to planet health.

To find out how optimising your workplace can help you retain your employees by fostering better social interactions, download here AKKA’s Innovative Workplace Expert guide, which contains the full version of this case study and more practical examples of other projects that show you how AKKA has increased team engagement and boost productivity over and over again for small, medium and large organizations, in a variety of industries and countries from around the world.

Use your workplace as a strategic tool to attract and retain the best talent.

The first most important quality that your workplace architect should have is: An aligned vision.

“Greatness starts with a clear vision of the future”

Would you rather have a colleague do a good job, or a great job? For most people, the answer to that question is easy. Great success stories are better than good ones. Great sales are better than good sales. When you are investing in a new workplace for your team, you want a great architect – not just a good one. And, as Sinek puts it, greatness starts with a vision.

One of the most important qualities in an architect is their vision. This translates into two questions: do they have one? And does it align with your organization’s vision? Everyone sees the world a little bit differently, and every architect will have a different vision – assuming they have one – of how the world should be, what the responsibilities of an architect are, what the relationship with clients and inhabitants should look like and how architecture can contribute to a better world.

When you are investing in a new workplace for your team, you want a great architect – not just a good one.

Architect's first most important quality for your workplace

When deciding on an architect to design your next workplace, it is not good enough that he/she has a vision. Their vision needs to align with the vision, values and goals of your own organization. As a workplace professional, whether Human Resources, Facility Managers or Corporate Real Estate managers, it is usually part of your scope to translate the organization’s vision and goals into the daily operations and manifestations of the company. Your workplace is no exception. It too, needs to represent as well as enable your vision, values and goals. Your architect needs to not only understand this but also embrace it. 

Your architect has to understand the goals of your business, and put them ahead of the aesthetics of the building.

Architect's first most important quality for your workplace
Architect's first most important quality for your workplace
Architect's first most important quality for your workplace

“The right workplace can accelerate your results and maximize your impact”

For the design of your workplace, you want to avoid an architect who sees your project as an opportunity to experiment with form. You even want to avoid architects that have a vision, if their vision is not connected to yours. In both the above cases, while the project may or may not turn out beautiful, it will surely not be one that nurtures your teams.At its worst, an architect who forces their own design on the company may make it impossible for the company to grow. Recent research has shown that “Workplace design needs then to be recognized for its role in work processes, not merely as an exercise to develop a three-dimensional representation of the brand or as a conundrum to match headcount with lettable area”1. Imagine trying to run a stock exchange in a daycare, or a veterinarian office from a public pool. Although these examples are extreme, an architect with a vision that does not match yours can make it that hard to work in your new environment. You want your architect to understand the goals of your business, and put them ahead of the aesthetics of the building. This does not mean an excuse for a workplace lacking aesthetics. As Stephanie Hughes says “beauty is not a luxury, it is essential”. A well-designed workplace will have both and place aesthetics at the service of the quality of the interactions it nurtures.

As a workplace professional, in your search for the perfect architect, remember to check for their vision and verify the alignment of visions and values. While there are many things you want to be checking for, at the core of it all, interview your architect to find out if their vision revolves around people. People are the core of it and a great starting point. According to the International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Health and Well-being, “well-being in the workplace is considered the outcome of workplace interactions.”2. The more you focus on the quality of workplace interactions within your team, the more you will benefit from higher productivity, lower turn over, and happier employees.

What better way to improve the quality of a building, than to find an architect whose vision involves promoting positive workplace interactions? An architect with this sort of vision can help bridge the gap between where you are now, and where you want to go, by giving you the workplace that supports your daily interactions at work.

So when it comes to finding the best architect to design your workplace, the first most important qualities you are looking for is an aligned vision.There is however, a second most important quality to look for when hiring an architect for your workplace design: click here to read all about it.

 We believe that space is a strategic tool that can foster interactions, and any added value or innovation, small or large, starts with interactions. Interactions are the seeds of innovation. At the intersection of the main forms of interaction – creativity, collaboration and learning –added value emerges. Are you interested in learning about our vision at AKKA and how it can support your workplace design? Download here the excerpt of the book The Power of Interactions.

Align and Engage your entire workforce to achieve massive growth in your Organisation.

Is an architect enough for relocating or redesigning your workplace?

Sometimes it isn’t enough to put a fresh coat of paint or throw around a few Fatboys, to improve your workplace. If you’ve outgrown your current workplace, in size or in quality, meaning, you need to improve the design of your current workplace, you will need an architect in order to make those changes. But is an architect even enough?

If you’re hoping to make your office a workplace that truly enables your employees to be their best, an architect may not be enough. Architects tend to look purely at the form and function of an office space, to the exclusion of a lot else. As an architect myself, I can tell you, many opportunities are lost due to that narrow focus, including opportunities to make your employees happier, healthier, and more productive. Even if you select an architect with a vast experience and well-developed skills, and even if you do end up with a beautiful and functional workplace, you could be harming your employees rather than supporting and nurturing them.

It should come as no surprise to those who have experienced working in a positive environment that positive interactions in the workplace and happiness are directly linked.1We’re happier when we get along with the people we work with, and when the workplace we go to every day is designed to make our work more meaningful and our quality of life better.

Many opportunities are lost due to that narrow focus, including opportunities to make your employees happier, healthier, and more productive.

architect for redesigning your workplace

When designing and planning your new workplace, it is not enough to have someone focused on form and function. You need someone that has a good understanding of ‘flow’: meaning how people interact with each other. Most importantly, the design of the workplace not only needs to take into account how people interact in the workplace; it is to be designed in order to nurture people’s interactions in the workplace.

A great design will take into account the form, function, and flow in a space. Think about how a person walks from one place to another. Will they be tempted to cut through another person’s workplace because it is faster, constantly disrupting them? A good design will make it so that the natural flow of a building doesn’t disrupt any workers. Even better, the natural flow will be designed to create added value for all people in the company.

If you’re wondering who can help you design and build such a utopia-sounding workplace, you’ll be right to think that your architect should — but many won’t. You’ll want to make sure the architect you choose has the vision, the strategies and the experience, of designing for interactions. Bear in mind, that an experience designing workplaces does not automatically translate into an experience designing for interactions. We all know too many beautiful and even functional buildings that make their inhabitants miserable.

Unlike the majority of architects, you’re looking for an architect with a deep understanding of human interactions, an architect that is also a Workplace Interactions Expert.

A great design will take into account the form, function, and flow in a space.

architect for redesigning your workplace
architect for redesigning your workplace
architect for redesigning your workplace
How to find a Workplace Interactions Expert architect

Architects with experience in workplace interactions are out there, and they can elevate not only the look and feel and functionality but also the entire experience of your workplace. Whether you are starting from scratch, or just updating an old facility, a Workplace Interactions Architect is your key to increasing productivity and creating a workplace that is easy, nurturing and enjoyable to work in.

Luckily, the effect of architecture on people’s well-being, performance and happiness is catching on in the architectural world, as more people are understanding the value of it.2 Smart offices, the use of color, texture, and natural lighting in the workplace, as well as other less obvious features of architecture that balance human health and productivity, are becoming more and more popular.

While most architects still look at a building purely in terms of how it looks, Workplace Interactions Architects are gaining momentum, as more and more clients, specially HR, FM and CRE3 managers as well as other workplace professionals, demand the best quality of workplaces for their employees.

If you are wondering whether the architects you are considering are Workplace Interactions Experts, a shortcut for you is to pick up the phone and first talk to them and listen closely to the language and words they use. You also would want to back their talk with their projects and past clients, so do check their work and their references. Architects that truly design for interactions are usually very passionate about what they do, and it will not be difficult to spot. You’ll be able to tell them apart from others through their focus on human interactions. Look for someone who wants to design the workplace in a way that fosters human interactions. That should be reflected both in their vision as well as their process. You surely can’t expect architects who work in the same customary process as every other architect to deliver a workplace that surpasses every other workplace!

During your search, you may be tempted to simply hire an architect to do the building side of things, and a Workplace Interactions Expert who is not an architect to make changes from there. A Workplace Interactions Expert who is not an architect may not be easily able to translate those interactions into the design of the space itself. You need both skills, ideally in the same party.

While they aren’t many and they surely aren’t common, great Workplace Interactions Architects do exist, if you can just find them. You need them in order to have a workplace that is nurturing and enabling for your employees. Simply relocating or updating your office space is not enough. Real change involves creating a workplace that is innovative not in terms of form or function, but rather in terms of flows, interactions, employee experience and happiness.

 We believe that space is a strategic tool that can foster interactions, and any added value or innovation, small or large, starts with interactions. Interactions are the seeds of innovation. At the intersection of the main forms of interaction – creativity, collaboration and learning –added value emerges. Would you like to learn more? Download here the excerpt of the book The Power of Interactions.

Align and Engage your entire workforce to achieve massive growth in your Organisation.

How to put Management and Leadership in practice as an HR Manager

These days, management has almost gotten a bad reputation and leadership is all organisations are after. Management has come to be seen as over-controlling, while leadership is looked up to, as a way for leaders to pioneer and guide a team. We know that management and leadership are not the same things, but what are the differences, and how do you practice the best of both in your company?

No matter how good you are as a leader or a manager, you can always improve with the help of feedback.

Management vs Leadership in the Workplace
What is leadership?

Leadership1 is the act of guiding your company or team to a specific goal. A great leader can help ordinary people produce extraordinary results. A great leader is people oriented, understands the vision of the company, and is able to communicate effectively. They inspire their team to do their best every day, and use their skills to engage and encourage their teammates on a daily basis. Leadership is an extraordinary skill, and it takes a talented person to be able to take a group of people, and help them perform at their best.

"The single biggest way to impact an organization is to focus on leadership development. There is almost no limit to the potential of an organization that recruits good people, raises them up as leaders and continually develops them."

A great leader is people oriented, understands the vision of the company, and is able to communicate effectively.

Management vs Leadership in the Workplace
Management vs Leadership in the Workplace
Management vs Leadership in the Workplace
What is management?

Management2 is the act of having control over a particular task or team. You can manage something even if there are no other people involved, such as being the manager of the server room, or managing the stock for a restaurant.

In order to be successful at management, you need to be task driven, have good communication skills, and you need a great sense of project management. In order to be a good manager, you need to stay focused on a goal, and to be able to understand how to move towards that goal as efficiently as possible.

"The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it."

How to get the best of both worlds

Imagine the best race car ever created. The entrepreneur is the person who built this one of a kind innovative race car, the leader would be the one to decide where to go with this car, and the manager would be the one to drive it there.

In order for a business to be successful, you need a certain amount of leadership and management. Some of the skills you need for management and leadership overlap, while others are different. This is why there is often confusion about where leadership ends and management begins.

Although these two tasks are different, a good manager can also be a good leader, and the other way around. Here are a few tips for you as a workplace professional, whether in HR, FM or CRE for getting the best of both worlds.3

  • Value feedback
    No matter how good you are as a leader or a manager, you can always improve with the help of feedback. It’s very hard to be objective about your own work, and feedback from your team can both make them feel more heard, and improve your future work.
  • Set achievable goals
    Whether you are a manager or a leader, if you set the bar too high, you won’t be able to reach it. Not being able to reach a goal is demoralising, and it may even stop your team from trying for easier goals. It’s okay to aim high, but make sure that it is also achievable. That is not to say, reduce or limit your goals. Not at all! Consider for example breaking up a large goal into smaller achievable milestones.
  • Manage things and lead people4
    Perhaps the best way to get the best of both worlds is to understand and act on the difference between the two jobs. Management should be about tasks and things, leadership is about relationships and people. When you truly understand the difference, you will be able to handle both effectively.

Management and leadership are different set of skills with different characteristics. It is however quite common that one person needs to perform both. In order to engage the employees in your company, and support them to achieve company goals and succeed for themselves, their team and the company, define your two roles of manager and leader as separate jobs for yourself, and practice both fully.

Want to know how to align and engage your entire workforce? Download here the workbook The Power of Interactions and make sure you set yourself up for success by aligning your teams, all employees and your workplace towards creating the outstanding employee experience you need to take your organisation to the next level of success. 

Your guide to aligning and engaging your entire workforce around any transformation.

What are the best places to work international?

It is every company’s desire to be the place where candidates line up for an employment opportunity. However, some companies have embraced that desire and made it less of a wish and more of a real goal. When a company is considered a ‘best place to work’ for employees, it doesn’t just mean the company has great job perks, it means there is something fundamentally right about it that makes it amazing in every aspect of the employee experience.

Even if being one of the best places to work is not your priority goal at this moment, I am sure you have at least a desire for it and you would agree that improvements in that area, can only benefit your employees and your company. In order to help give you ideas for improvements in your own company, we have rounded up a collection of the companies voted the best to work for by employees for 2019. Let us take a look at what they did to become so successful and see what can we learn from them.

best places to work
Hubspot

Hubspot is a developer and marketer of different kinds of software. They were voted the #1 business to work for on Glassdoor1. Hubspot strives to make their company culture one of the most friendly and inviting in the world, and they made several big changes this year to try and improve things. For example, Hubspot set their first diversity goal striving to include more cultures from around the world, and made inclusivity their main focus. They think this new focus in their business may be what made them hands down the top favorite place to work for by employees.2

Southwest Airlines

Although they aren’t always #1, Southwest Airlines has been notable as a favorite place for employees for as long as they’ve been in business— which is over 45 years. In all this time, they have never had to lay off a single employee or cut their pay3. In anonymous interviews, Southwest Airline employees had a lot to say about the company, and why it is incredibly exciting to work there. Among many, they cited team unity, a culture of appreciation, and opportunities for advancement as reasons they loved working for this company.4

best places to work
best places to work
best places to work
In-N-Out Burger

When we think of a fantastic company to work for, a fast food joint is probably not what comes to mind first. Yet In-N-Out Burger has been a “Top Place to Work” for 5 consecutive years on Glassdoor5, and has extremely high ratings by their employees. In an interview with the CEO of In-N-Out Burger, Lynsi Snyder, she mentioned selecting leaders for their ability to engage employees, a positive work environment, and skill training as some of the reasons employees love working there. In addition, exciting job perks, a generous starting salary, and a company backed retirement plan, probably help.6

The three companies above are only a small sample. However, they show that companies can be a great place to work, no matter which industry they operate in. As a company, you do not need to have all the right elements to be a top place to work, what you do need is to have the few elements that are right for your employees specifically. When a company has the few but right pieces of the puzzle, employees will love working there. Although the companies in this article are very different, and may have different practices to make employees happy, they all use many of the same underlying principles behind the practices. You can make your company a top place to work as well, by cultivating a positive and inclusive workplace, engaging your employees in ways that work specifically for your culture, and offering them the opportunities they need, whether to grow, balance their personal life, or better bond with colleagues. Remember, it doesn’t matter what your company does—it matters how your company makes employees feel and what experience it offers them.

If you are planning to cultivate a positive and inclusive workplace, engage your employees in ways that work specifically for your culture, and offer them the opportunities they need, you need your employees’ help. While you may know your employees quite well and have an idea about their needs, it is a risky endeavour to decide for them. Your best bet is to get that information from them directly. Sounds like this could be a daunting process? It is for many companies and this is why we have developed a four phases, easy to follow, step-by-step process to guide you in aligning and engaging any group of people. Get your free copy now. 

Your guide to aligning and engaging your entire workforce around any transformation.

The team development & management strategies that most HR Leaders use

A great team is an unstoppable force in a company. A team that works well together is capable of doing anything, and it is well worth the time and money it takes to develop it. As an HR leader, one of your goals is probably to develop such a team, or even better, find a way to consistently and successfully develop great teams.

There are a number of philosophies and strategies you can adopt when it comes to team management and development, and all of them lead to vastly different results. We have rounded up a few of them here for you.

A great team is an unstoppable force in a company.

organise your team as an HR leader
Self governance

The members of a self-governing team agree among themselves what rules to follow, how best to get work done, and who does what. This greater freedom is beneficial in that it allows the freedom for teams to reach their full potential, and with it, the promise of better collaboration and maybe even innovation.

Valve Press is an example of a company that adopted a business model without any kind of top down management.1 Valve Press employees picked what projects they wanted to work on, and never answered to anyone. This resulted in only projects that had a good chance of success being picked, effectively screening and eliminating poor projects before they even began.

Of course, self-governance isn’t without its drawbacks. A self-governed team requires a high initial investment as they learn to work out the kinks, and may need more time to come up with plans than a managed team would.2

organise your team as an HR leader
organise your team as an HR leader
organise your team as an HR leader
Hands-on management approach

On the opposite side of the coin, a hands-on management approach provides a clear authority in a manager who is there to guide the team through projects. This doesn’t have to mean micromanaging every detail of a team’s dynamics, but instead giving a team the benefit of your knowledge and experience from a lifetime of getting projects off the ground.

Hands-on ensures quality from a team, and reduces inefficiency, but it may come at the price of creativity. A team that has constant oversight and direction given to them may become complacent and somehow ‘lazy’ in following direction. They risk sticking to what they feel is safe, without questioning whether what they are doing is best, useful or truly innovative.

By blending together strategies, you can find what suits your unique team and make the most of it.

Autonomous teams

A recent method of team organization is known as Autonomous teams, which consists in giving teams a vague direction to follow, and allowing them to make their own decision from there on. A 2013 study published in the Ivey Business Journal found that autonomous teams, although unusual, were often wildly successful.3

While this may seem similar to self-governing teams, all of the successful autonomous teams in the study reported good management and a hands-on approach as part of their success. All of the failed teams reported poor management as a factor in their failure.

Balance is key

Although all of the different types of team organization have pros and cons, the best choice is often a delicate balance between different extremes. By blending together strategies, you can find what suits your unique team and make the most of it. By putting in a guiding hand when necessary, you can still give your team the freedom they need to be successful, without interfering with their innovation and creativity.

Want to know how to align and engage your entire workforce? Download here the workbook The Power of Interactions and make sure you set yourself up for success by aligning your teams, all employees and your workplace towards creating the outstanding employee experience you need to take your organisation to the next level of success. 

Your guide to aligning and engaging your entire workforce around any transformation.

New ways of working in today's forward-thinking companies.

These days, the normal routine of 9-5 at an office place is no longer ‘normal’. The best and brightest talent value a work/life balance more than almost any other type of job perk, and companies are responding with new types of work schedules. These new work styles include agile working, activity-based working, flex working, and hot desking, among others. But what do they each mean exactly and how are they different? Here’s a quick overview of the most common workplace practices, and what the preliminary pros and cons may be.

New ways of working include agile working, activity-based working, flex working, and hot desking, among others.

new ways of working
Flex Work, a.k.a flexitime, flexible work, flexiwork.

Flex work is probably the most common type of work style offered by companies around the world. Flex work, or a flexible work schedule, allows employees to set the hours they want to work, when they want to work them. This means that if they need to come in later during a weekday so they can get to a dentist appointment, they can.

Flextime usually requires that employees be there for certain periods of the day, usually around the middle while the time at the beginning and end are flexible. This allows managers to schedule meetings when everyone will be there, while still allowing employees the flexibility they desire. Studies have also shown another benefit: Employers who implement flex work tend to have more productive employees than those who don’t.1

Pros of flex work:

  • Greater flexibility for employees
  • Attracts new talent to the workplace
  • Allows flexibility while still making time for meetings, encounters, overlaps… etc.
  • More productive employees

Cons of flex work:

  • Doesn’t offer the same incentives as agile work
  • Less predictability in employee availability

Flex work is not perfect, but it is a great compromise between an employer’s need for consistency, and an employee’s need for more flexibility in his/her work schedule.

new ways of working
new ways of working
new ways of working
Activity-based Work

Have you ever felt like the cubicle you’ve been assigned to work in is just not right for the job at hand?  In activity-based work, you wouldn’t have a dedicated cubicle, office or even desk all of your own. Instead, you’ll move to a new location on the work floor based on what it is you need to do. If you need to be close to the 3D printer you can move right next to it, or if you need a secluded place to think, you can move away from the crowded center of the building.

While activity-based work is great for some people, it might not be as enjoyable for others. If you really like having your own dedicated space, this might not be as attractive to you as other types of work.

Pros of activity-based work:

  • The promise of the best work setting for each specific work dynamic
  • Possibility for serendipitous encounters due to the moving around
  • More variety of work settings offered around the office to suit the preferences of different personalities. 

Cons of activity-based work:

  • May not suit all employees, due to the loss of the dedicated work space
Hot Desking

Hot desking transforms the office landscape by making desks first come first served, or on a rota system, rather than assigned. In this situation, employees find themselves working alongside a variety of different team members.

This results in more opportunities for serendipitous meetings, ideas exchanges among new people,  brainstorming, and better interactions overall that can result in better overall growth for the company. Hot desking may not be a good solution for introvert employees, those with artistic personalities or even the ones that prefer having their own dedicated ‘home base’.

Pros of hot desking:

  • Promotes employees’ social encounters and bonding
  • Fosters the cross-pollination of ideas
  • Leads to a more efficient use of available workspace

Cons of hot desking:

  • May not be suitable for all employees
  • Studies are divided as to the benefots of hot desking2
Agile Work

Agile work is frequently confused with a flex work schedule. Agile work has many of the same features as flextime, including allowing employees to choose what time they come in or what time they leave. The difference is that in agile work, the major focus is on allowing employees to work when and how they want to, without constraints. Instead of limiting the flexibility to a few hours, they can work from home, come in only in the afternoons, or simply get their project done and go home for the day.

Agile working is a whole company concept, and can include hot desking, activity-based work, or flexitime as part of the effort. Agile working is harder on employers due to the difficulty in balancing meetings and other important functions, but it is more attractive to employees.

Pros of Agile Work:

  • Very attractive to new talent
  • Boosts employee morale by giving them more freedom.

Cons of agile work:

  • More difficult for employers to arrange meetings
These workplace practices all have their pros and cons. In order to choose what’s right for your company, it’s important to think about the direction you want the company to take. The more you can offer employees, the easier it will be to find and keep great talent. However, it is also important to preserve the company performance. Finding the sweet spot is what this is all about. Each one of these ways of working has a place in business, but they need to be managed carefully in order to keep employees happy and company performance high.

Download here the book The Power of Interactions and make sure you choose the right direction for your company by aligning your teams, all employees and your workplace towards creating the outstanding employee experience you need to take your organisation to the next level of success.  

Align and Engage your entire workforce to achieve massive growth in your Organisation.

What is Hostmanship and how can you —as an HR professional— use it when attracting, retraining, and developing talent.

When we think of hostmanship, we tend to think of how we treat our customers. Every good organization wants its customers to feel comfortable reporting any problems they may have, and every good organization aims to make their experience with the company as smooth as possible. It makes sense to keep customers as happy as possible, but customers and clients are not the only stakeholders that hostmanship can benefit. HR, Facility Management and Corporate real estate workplace professionals can also use this concept to make their employees feel happier thus boosting the entire organization’s success.

Hostmanship is the art of making somebody feel welcome. When implemented as a strategy for attracting, retraining, and developing talent, it can be a game changer for a company. Here is how you can use hostmanship to benefit your employees in the workplace.

When Hostmanship is implemented as a strategy for attracting, retraining, and developing talent, it can be a game changer for a company.

Hostmanship employees workplace
How hostmanship can help attract and retain talent.

A truly great team member can take their talent anywhere. There is always a door waiting to be thrown open for them. It is for this reason that good talent is so hard to attract in the first place, let alone keep for any length of time.

When you practice hostmanship around the talent you are seeking to recruit, your goal is to create a welcoming atmosphere that makes them feel like they are truly at home. Millennials and Generation Z are willing to compromise when it comes to money and job perks in exchange for a friendly work environment that they consider a true fit for them.

For most people, a friendly work environment comprises of:

  • People who listen, whether that is to complaints, ideas, or questions.
  • A cause they can believe in
  • Positive people and a forward-looking attitude
  • Gratitude for a job well done and recognition of a valuable contribution

According to Jan Gunnarsson, a leading keynote speaker on the topic of hostmanship, all of these characteristics of a friendly work environment start by learning how to welcome yourself and what constitutes “feeling at home” for you.1

Millennials and Generation Z are willing to compromise when it comes to money and job perks in exchange for a friendly work environment that they consider a true fit for them.

Hostmanship employees workplace
Hostmanship employees workplace
Hostmanship employees workplace
Developing talent with hostmanship.

It’s far easier to train people with great personalities and a can-do attitude, than it is to hire a sour person who already has the skills. (For more about ‘attitude vs. skills’, feel free to read this article: Attitude: The number one factor when hiring new employees.

When your employees are trained with a welcoming attitude that is understanding of mistakes, they know they can grow more confidently. This actually leads to faster growth in general, but will also make your team more productive over time.

Polls conducted by Gallup and the Queen School of Business show that employees in stressful environment were 37% more likely to request sick days, had 49% more accidents, and were 18% less productive compared to their stress free competitors.2 When looking at the big picture, cultivating a positive atmosphere can be very beneficial for everyone, company, customers and employees included.

It is often difficult to choose a positive culture over a cut-throat one. Many business owners and executives think that a cut-throat culture will drive employees to better success, but it actually does the opposite 3. The most forward-thinking companies are choosing to make their employees welcome, and they are reaping the dividends of this approach.

Practicing hostmanship in your company is something you can do to make your employees feel like a welcome part of your team. Employees who feel like you truly want them and appreciate them in your company will work harder, and reach greater heights, than an employee that is just there for a paycheck.

Create a welcoming workplace for your employees is definitely an ongoing process. While you may know your employees quite well and have an idea about their needs, it is much more effective – as well as easier and more enjoyable, believe me! – to actually engage them in a participatory process. Sounds like this could be a daunting process? It is unfortunately the case for many companies. This is why we have developed a four phases, easy to follow, step-by-step process to guide you in aligning and engaging any group of people. Get your free copy now.

Your guide to aligning and engaging your entire workforce around any transformation.

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“We would like to express our gratitude for the time you invested in helping us get to a clear picture.  Anna and I really appreciated the call we had with you, your responsiveness, and the great empathy that you exhibited throughout – we certainly felt very “well taken care of” when engaging with you.  On the practical side, we especially appreciated that there was the option to obtain robust bottom-up cost estimates for the construction itself (not every design architect offers this).”

-Private Client of AKKA

 

 

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